TIMES, TIME, AND HALF A TIME. A HISTORY OF THE NEW MILLENNIUM.

Comments on a cultural reality between past and future.

This blog describes Metatime in the Posthuman experience, drawn from Sir Isaac Newton's secret work on the future end of times, a tract in which he described Histories of Things to Come. His hidden papers on the occult were auctioned to two private buyers in 1936 at Sotheby's, but were not available for public research until the 1990s.



Friday, October 25, 2019

Materialist Rhetoric: The Splice


A rat embryo. Image Source: Science Pictures ltd/SPL via Science.

This week, I am highlighting vocabulary which is being used by materialists to explain their long term goals and beliefs. I will then expand on where all this is going. For today, a news headline from The Post Millennial: Japanese scientists to grow rat embryos spliced with 30 percent human DNA. The plan is to grow human organs inside animals, and the word 'splice' is equated with 'help.' The plan was explained in Nature on 26 July 2019:
"A Japanese stem-cell scientist is the first to receive government support to create animal embryos that contain human cells and transplant them into surrogate animals since a ban on the practice was overturned earlier this year.

Hiromitsu Nakauchi, who leads teams at the University of Tokyo and Stanford University in California, plans to grow human cells in mouse and rat embryos and then transplant those embryos into surrogate animals. Nakauchi's ultimate goal is to produce animals with organs made of human cells that can, eventually, be transplanted into people.

Until March, Japan explicitly forbade the growth of animal embryos containing human cells beyond 14 days or the transplant of such embryos into a surrogate uterus. That month, Japan’s education and science ministry issued new guidelines allowing the creation of human–animal embryos that can be transplanted into surrogate animals and brought to term. ...

Nakauchi says he plans to proceed slowly, and will not attempt to bring any hybrid embryos to term for some time. Initially, he plans to grow hybrid mouse embryos until 14.5 days, when the animal’s organs are mostly formed and it is almost to term. He will do the same experiments in rats, growing the hybrids to near term, about 15.5 days. Later, Nakauchi plans to apply for government approval to grow hybrid embryos in pigs for up to 70 days."

Thursday, October 24, 2019

Quantum Computing Rhetoric: In a Word, Supremacy


Demonstrating Quantum Supremacy (23 October 2019). Video Source: Youtube.

In an attempt to understand where advanced technology is headed in cultural terms, I will begin simply by presenting examples of rhetoric used at Silicon Valley Corporations and by other tech developers. Each word provides the vocabulary of a new priestly class. Today's word comes from Google: supremacy.


See all posts in the What's Left Over? series on materialism and anti-materialism in technological advancement.

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

What's Left Over? The Materialist Algorithm for Cognition


Image Source: Morten Tolboll.

This post continues my investigation of materialism and anti-materialism as competing responses to technology. My central argument is that right-wing and left-wing descriptions of politics and the economy are misleading and obsolete. Politics and economics are evolving to mirror tech-oriented materialism and anti-materialism. The worst of the former is leading to tyrannical political oppression. The worst of the latter is leading to an alienation from the mainstream consensus about reality.

Thus far in this blog series, I have focussed on materialism as a way of seeing the world, which is grounded in empiricism, scientific exploration, rationalism, secularism, and the associated economic mode of capitalist consumption. All of these aspects concentrate on humankind's five senses and how they can measure and experience the physical realm.

More radical forms of materialism reveal where this is stance is headed. In 2013, Stephen J. Cowley and Frédéric Vallée-Tourangeau edited a collected volume of scholarly essays entitled, Cognition beyond the Brain: Computation, Interactivity and Human Artifice. The editors explain that the notion that we are free to think inside our heads is a fairy tale. They argue that the thoughts we have inside our own heads as private expressions of personal existence, and as ego-controlled responses to the outside world, constitute a bedtime story we tell ourselves about our independence as individual beings.

'Thinking,' for these academics, is not an internalized activity expressing the cognitive power and freedom of a single, rational creature. Rather, as I suggested in my post, Who Writes Your Reality?, 'thinking' is a culturally-modulated experience. It is even possibly constructed from the outside in. That is, your brain from this materialist standpoint is like a Tabula rasa, upon which the outside world may write its programs as it wishes. The editors of Cognition beyond the Brain call old-fashioned notions of subjective 'thinking' a 'folk concept,' a culturally-shaped story we tell ourselves about what we are doing:
"Like all folk concepts, ‘thinking’ is a second-order construct used to ‘explain’ observations or, specifically, how action is—and should be—integrated with perception."
This is a radical departure from the earlier Postmodern deification of the subjective mind, wherein social objectivities were demolished and everyone's personal truth was considered sacrosanct.

Thursday, October 17, 2019

New Post at The Dragonfly: The Secret Worship I


Hidden Treasure by Nicholas Roerich (1947). Image Source: Words of Power.

I have a new post up at The Dragonfly:

Who Writes Your Reality?

The post explores the idea that our realities are shaped by fiction genres, the implications of that fact, and asks how we may escape from the genre as a story-telling device.

The post continues my contemplation of the evolution of a secret religion of the Self inside secularist rationalism and materialism. It is necessary to understand these moral and mental prisons in order to encourage the growth of science and technology today, while preventing their distortion into exploitation and tyranny.

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

To Know What World We Live In: The Son of Sam


Untermyer Park, Yonkers, New York, USA. Image Source: Atlas Obscura.

For the past several years, I have participated in the Hallowe'en Countdown blogathon. I won't this year, due to personal matters. But I will touch on topics this month which were intended for the countdown. The first such issue concerns David Berkowitz's Son of Sam murders in 1976 and 1977 in New York City. A case summary is here. I have previously blogged about this case, here.

The Temple of Love in Untermyer Gardens. Image Source: Untapped Cities.

In an April 1977 letter left by Berkowitz near one of his murder scenes, the killer referred to himself as the 'Son of Sam': "I am a monster. I am the 'Son of Sam.'" Berkowitz later claimed that 'Sam' was his former neighbour, Sam Carr, and that 'Son of Sam' referred to Carr's demon-possessed dog. Others have speculated that 'Sam' referred to the USA as 'Uncle Sam.' The police offered the possessed dog story to the public, even though a psychiatrist who assessed Berkowitz believed that the killer knew the dog story was bunk.

Thus, at the heart of this case, the name which Berkowitz adopted for himself remains a mystery.

I noticed a curious coincidence in the Persian poem, The Shahnameh (شاهنامه) or The Book of Kings. Written by the poet Ferdowsi, it is the national epic of Iran; it took over thirty years to compose and has almost one thousand chapters. While the poem was completed around 1010 CE, it refers to the much earlier history of the Persian Empire in mythical and quasi-historical terms, from the dawn of time up to the Arab Islamic conquest. You can read the work in English translation, here and here.

There is a section in The Shahnameh entitled, Zāl, the Son of Sam, about an albino child who is rejected by his father, a warrior named Sam:
"No human being of this earth
Could give to such a monster birth;
He must be of the Demon race,
Though human still in form and face."
The father abandons the child on a mountaintop to die, where the baby is raised by Simurgh, the "Shah of birds." You can read the tale of Sam and his son Zaal in English prose translation here and here. Zaal becomes a Persian king who lives for three hundred years and watches his personal dynasty fail and die.

The Simurgh: The Flight of the Simorgh (ca. 1590 CE). Painted at the Mughal Court of Akbar by the artist Basawan. Image Source: The Seringapatam Times.

When Berkowitz adopted 'Son of Sam' as his alter ego, he may have been referring to Sam and Zaal in The Shahnameh, or to a corrupted derivative thereof adopted by New York City's hippie cultists.